DIY Recipe for Sourdough Starter

Looking for a DIY recipe for a sourdough starter? This tutorial will show how you can make your own.How To Start Your Very Own Sourdough Starter!

DIY Recipe for Sourdough Starter

Not all of us are so lucky to have a sourdough starter passed down to us from our grandma’s secret recipe book. But if you’re feeling a bit adventurous you can actually make (or grow) your own Sourdough Starter with this DIY recipe!

A sourdough starter is made from two simple ingredients — flour and water. It attracts wild yeast which lives everywhere in the environment. In a way, sourdough starter is how we cultivate the wild yeast in a form which can be useful for baking. This culture of microorganisms is what will leaven your bread and make it taste so darn good!

Making your own sourdough starter may take up a little time but you’ll surely enjoy the process. Have kids in the house? Do this little project with them and cultivate their scientific minds while cultivating your food.

Making a sourdough starter basically involves mixing flour and water together then leaving it alone for a little while. However, if you want the feisty critters to make your bread rise, making a sourdough starter will involve more than having it hang around your kitchen. Growing a sourdough starter takes about 5 days on the average, but it can take longer depending on the conditions of the environment. We have compiled simple, painless step-by-step guide to making your own starter and what to expect on a daily basis.  You can find the original article here.

How To Start Your Very Own Sourdough Starter!

Sourdough Starter Ingredients

  • 2-quart glass or plastic container (not metal)
  • Measuring cups
  • Mixing spoon
  • Plastic wrap or container lid
  • Flour
  • Water

Day 1: Make the initial starter

Ingredients for Sourdough Starter | How To Start Your Very Own Sourdough Starter!

via The Kitchn

Weigh 4 ounces or 3/4 cup + 2 tablespoons of flour and combine with 4 ounces of water. Stir vigorously until combined into a sticky, thick batter. Cover the container with plastic wrap and leave it on your kitchen counter or somewhere with a consistent room temperature of 70°F to 75°F. Do not refrigerate.

Day 2:  Stir the party in your bottle

Stir the Sourdough Starter | How To Start Your Very Own Sourdough Starter!

Bubbly Starter Dough | How To Start Your Very Own Sourdough Starter!

via Serious Eats

On the first 24 hours, you will already find a few tiny bubbles. This means that the yeast has already started a party in your jar! Stir the bottle every once in a while u to attract more yeast and to ‘move’ the little critters towards their food. After all, yeasts don’t run around the jar. They’re floating and eating whatever is nearby so a little stirring here and there is just as important as a feeding. By the end of the day, you’ll be sure to find more bubbles in your jar.

 

Day 3: Feed the starter

Stir the Sourdough Starter | How To Start Your Very Own Sourdough Starter!

via King Arthur Flour

Take a good look at your starter. You may find that more bubbles have started to appear and that’s a good thing! This means that the yeast has also started making themselves at home in your starter. It’s now time to feed the starter with more flour and water! Measure another 4 ounces of flour and 4 ounces of water, stir vigorously until combined into a smooth batter.

 

Day 4: More feeding and more stirring

Feeding the Starter Dough | How To Start Your Very Own Sourdough Starter!

via Plant and Plate

By now, your starter should look extremely bubbly and the volume should have doubled. Also, the aroma should be noticeably sour. Feed your starter with the same amount of flour and water, stir vigorously or whisk if you prefer. Stirring will make it easier for the yeast to get oxygen, an important factor if you want your yeast culture to reproduce.

 

Day 5: Time for your first harvest

Sourdough Starter | How To Start Your Very Own Sourdough Starter Recipe

via Domowe Receptury

Give your starter a good long look. Before harvesting, make sure that your starter is already ‘ripe’. One way of knowing this is to fill a glass with water and drop a teaspoon of starter into the glass. If it floats, it’s ready to use. If it sinks, don’t despair. Give it an additional day and more feeding.

 

Day 6 and beyond: Maintain your starter

Maintain Sourdough Starter | How To Start Your Very Own Sourdough Starter Recipe

via Nothing But Onions

If you’ll be using your starter often, discard half of it and keep feeding it with the same amount of flour and water daily. But if it will be longer before you use the starter again, cover your container tightly and place it in the fridge. Take it out of the fridge and feed it at least once a week to keep your starter going.